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Annunciation Church
Publish Date: 2021-01-24
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Xeniarome
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Annunciation Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (231) 799-0185
  • Street Address:

  • 185 East Pontaluna Road

  • Muskegon, MI 49444


Contact Information






Services Schedule

Orthros/Matins: Sunday, 9:00 AM
Divine Liturgy:
 Sunday, 10:00 AM

 

 


Past Bulletins


Parish Calendar

  • Parish Calendar

    January 24 to February 7, 2021

    Sunday, January 24

    9:00AM Matins Service (Orthros)

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy

    Monday, January 25

    7:00PM GOA Zoom Seminar - PPP Loan

    Saturday, January 30

    9:00AM Orthros

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy: Synaxis of The Three Hierarchs: Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, & John Chrysostom

    Sunday, January 31

    Parish Vasilopita

    9:00AM Matins Service (Orthros)

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy

    Monday, February 1

    6:00PM Great Vespers for the Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple

    Tuesday, February 2

    9:00AM Matins Service (Orthros)

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy for the The Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple

    Saturday, February 6

    12:00PM Saint Irene's Orphanage Google Meeting

    Sunday, February 7

    Philoptochos - Go Red for Women

    9:00AM Matins Service (Orthros)

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy

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Sunday School Games

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Future Stained Glass

    Stained Glass Progress

    Stained Glass Progress

    The glass for the main body of the windows has now been cut out. At the moment, the craftsmen at Omnibus Studios are cutting out the glass for the center medallion.


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Parish News & Events

Live Streaming

The Orthros and Divine Liturgy for Sunday will be streamed live around  8:40 AM. To access the stream please click here.

If you would like to pray along, click on the links below for Sunday's service:

If you are experiencing technical issues or have questions about the live stream during a live Sunday service, John Wehmer is available for assistance and he can be reached at home (616-847-6409) or on his cell (616-502-4800).


Congratulations!

Congratulations to Nick Davros who is the head JV Coach for the Mona Shores High School Football team. For the second straight year, Mona Shores won the Division 2 state championship following a 25-19 win over Warren De La Salle on Friday at Ford Field in Detroit.  It was the 18th consecutive victory for Mona Shores.


Upcoming Feastday Services

  • Divine Liturgy for the Synaxis of the Three Hierarchs: Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, & John Chrysostom - Saturday, January 30th: 9:00 AM Orthros | Divine Liturgy 10:00 AM.
  • Great Vespers for the Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple - Monday, February 1st: 6:00 PM
  • Divine Liturgy for the Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple - Tuesday, February 2nd9:00 AM Orthros | Divine Liturgy 10:00 AM.

Parish Vasilopita

The parish Vasilopita distribution will take place on Sunday, January 31st after Divine Liturgy. In addition, Philoptochos will be accepting donations for St. Basil's Academy at the candle stand.


Saint Irene's Orphanage Google Meeting

Our parish will host a Google Meet on Saturday, February 6th @ 12:00 PM with Fr. Constantinos of the St. Irene Orthodox Mission & Orphanage in Kenya, Africa. This meeting will allow us to reconnect with Fr. Constantinos and to learn more about the latest developments at the Orphanage since his visit to Muskegon. In addition, Fr. Constantinos will share with us first-hand accounts of Orthodox missionary work in Kenya during the time of Covid.   This meeting is open to all parishioners:

Phone Numbers
(‪US‬)‪+1 385-645-7080‬
PIN: ‪675 562 309#‬

Philoptochos - Go Red for Women

February is "Go Red for Women." This observance is the American Heart Association's national movement, and a Philoptochos focus, to end heart disease and stroke in women. Last year we presented all women at church with the "Red Dress" lapel pin. Time to wear this wherever you go in February to make a statement of support. On Sunday, February 7th please wear any outfit highlighting the "Go Red for Women" theme. 


End of Year Statements

If you would like a 2020 End of Year Stewardship statement, please email Karen Eifert at kjeifert@gmail.com.


2021 Stewardship

2021 Stewardship forms are located at the candle stand. Please consider filling out a form since it also allows the office to have updated information on file. Filled out forms can be placed in the wooden box of the donation stand. 

2021 stewardship can be securely and conveniently submitted online via Paypal. In addition, reoccurring donations can be set up on a weekly or monthly schedule using ACH withdrawal or with any major credit card. Click here if you would like to donate stewardship online through PayPal.

2021 offering envelopes are now available at the candle stand. Please note, if you will be using offering envelopes, you will have to write your name on each individual envelope when submitting stewardship donations. Envelope Numbers will no longer be used. Stewardship will now be recorded by NAME only. 

Thank you all for your continued support of our Church!


Philoptochos 2021 Stewardship

Kristi Karis will be collecting donations for the 2021 Philoptochos Stewardship. Donations can also be submitted online by clicking here. Thank you to all our members for a strong Philoptochos outreach during the pandemic. 


Inclement Weather Notifications

In the event of inclement weather, an email notification will be sent out for any cancellations or time changes. You can also check for weather notifications on:


Updated Guidelines

  • Anyone who is currently experiencing any symptoms of illness must stay at home.
  • Pews will be taped off to allow for distancing between individuals/families. Chairs will also be added around the walls of the Church.
  • Parishioners are required to wear masks.  It is recommended that parishioners bring their own masks. Mask will be provided at the candle stand for those who need one.
  • Please reverence icons by making the sign of the Cross and bowing instead of kissing them.
  • Parishes are not to have choirs until further notice.
  • There will be no liturgical books in the pews.
  • Parishioners are welcomed to receive andithiron after Holy Communion and at the dismissal of the Liturgy. Waxpaper will be provided.
  • Traditional trays/baskets will not be passed. A wooden donation box will be set up for parishioners who wish to make a Sunday offering as they exit the Church.
  • If you have any questions, please see a parish council member.
Holy Communion Guidelines
It is clearly understood that Holy Communion is the very Body and Blood of Christ which cannot be tainted by any harmful thing and that those who receive it with proper intent of mind and heart cannot be harmed by it. Clergy will follow the following guidelines so that the Holy Sacrament is safely administered:
  • Since there will be no Choir, we ask chantors to proceed for Holy Communion first followed by parishioners who be directed by a member of the parish council.
  • Please allow for at least 6 feet per parishioner. The center aisle of the Church will be marked with tape to help in keeping the appropriate distance between parishioners.
  • To receive communion, parishioners are asked to tilt their heads back so that the Holy Sacrament can be dropped into the mouth. It has been allowed that those receiving the Holy Eucharist can stay seated to make the above recommendations easier. 
  • Parishioners are asked not to touch or direct the communion cloth. An altar boy will hold the communion cloth under the chin.
  • Further instructions will be given in Church.

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Saints and Feasts

Xeniarome
January 24

Xenia, Deaconess of Rome

Our righteous Mother Xenia of Rome was of a distinguished family. While her parents were preparing to wed her, she stole away secretly, taking two handmaids with her, and departed for Mylasa of Karia in Asia Minor, and there she completed her life in asceticism. She was ordained deaconess by Paul, her spiritual father, who became Bishop of Mylasa. Although she was originally named Eusebia, to conceal her identity, she took the name Xenia - which means "stranger" in Greek - because of her estrangement from her country.


25_gregory1
January 25

Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople

This great Father and Teacher of the Church was born in 329 in Arianzus, a village of the second district of Cappadocia, not far from Nazianzus. His father, who later became Bishop of Nazianzus, was named Gregory (commemorated Jan. 1), and his mother was named Nonna (Aug. 5); both are among the Saints, and so are his brother Caesarius (Mar. 9) and his sister Gorgona (Feb. 23). At first he studied in Caesarea of Palestine, then in Alexandria, and finally in Athens. As he was sailing from Alexandria to Athens, a violent sea storm put in peril not only his life but also his salvation, since he had not yet been baptized. With tears and fervour he besought God to spare him, vowing to dedicate his whole self to Him, and the tempest gave way to calm. At Athens Saint Gregory was later joined by Saint Basil the Great, whom he already knew; but now their acquaintanceship grew into a lifelong brotherly love. Another fellow student of theirs in Athens was the young Prince Julian, who later as Emperor was called the Apostate because he denied Christ and did all in his power to restore paganism. Even in Athens, before Julian had thrown off the mask of piety; Saint Gregory saw what an unsettled mind he had, and said, "What an evil the Roman State is nourishing" (Orat. V, 24, PG 35:693).

After their studies at Athens, Gregory became Basil's fellow ascetic, living the monastic life together with him for a time in the hermitages of Pontus. His father ordained him presbyter of the Church of Nazianzus, and Saint Basil consecrated him Bishop of Sasima (or Zansima), which was in the archdiocese of Caesarea. This consecration was a source of great sorrow to Gregory, and a cause of misunderstanding between him and Basil; but his love for Basil remained unchanged, as can be plainly seen from his Funeral Oration on Saint Basil (Orat. XLIII).

About the Year 379, Saint Gregory came to the assistance of the Church of Constantinople, which had already been troubled for forty years by the Arians; by his supremely wise words and many labours he freed it from the corruption of heresy, and was elected Archbishop of that city by the Second Ecumenical Council, which assembled there in 381, and condemned Macedonius, Archbishop of Constantinople, the enemy of the Holy Spirit. When Saint Gregory came to Constantinople, the Arians had taken all the churches and he was forced to serve in a house chapel dedicated to Saint Anastasia the Martyr. From there he began to preach his famous five sermons on the Trinity, called the Triadica. When he left Constantinople two years later, the Arians did not have one church left to them in the city. Saint Meletius of Antioch (see Feb. 12), who was presiding over the Second Ecumenical Council, died in the course of it, and Saint Gregory was chosen in his stead; there he distinguished himself in his expositions of dogmatic theology.

Having governed the Church until 382, he delivered his farewell speech - the Syntacterion, in which he demonstrated the Divinity of the Son - before 150 bishops and the Emperor Theodosius the Great; in this speech he requested, and received from all, permission to retire from the see of Constantinople. He returned to Nazianzus, where he lived to the end of his life, and reposed in the Lord in 391, having lived some sixty-two years.

His extant writings, both prose and poems in every type of metre, demonstrate his lofty eloquence and his wondrous breadth of learning. In the beauty of his writings, he is considered to have surpassed the Greek writers of antiquity, and because of his God-inspired theological thought, he received the surname "Theologian." Although he is sometimes called Gregory of Nazianzus, this title belongs properly to his father; he himself is known by the Church only as Gregory the Theologian. He is especially called "Trinitarian Theologian," since in virtually every homily he refers to the Trinity and the one essence and nature of the Godhead. Hence, Alexius Anthorus dedicated the following verses to him:

Like an unwandering star beaming with splendour,
Thou bringest us by mystic teachings, O Father,
To the Trinity's sunlike illumination,
O mouth breathing with fire, Gregory most mighty.


Xenophon
January 26

Xenophon & his Companions

This Saint, a wealthy nobleman of Constantinople, was filled with piety toward God. He had two sons, Arcadius and John, whom he sent to Beirut to study law. But they were shipwrecked during their voyage; barely saved, they forsook all things and departed for Palestine. Saint Xenophon and his wife Mary, ignorant of what had happened, went in search of their sons. On finding them in Jerusalem, dressed in the habit of monks, they also took up the monastic life. And thus, having completed their lives in holiness, they departed for the Lord about the beginning of the sixth century. Saint Xenophon and his sons reposed at Saint Sabbas Monastery, and Mary at the Monastery of Saint Theodosius.


E_1_monologion_of_basi_ii-translation_of_relics_of_st__john_chrysostom
January 27

Removal of the Relics of John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople

This event took place on this day in the year 438, when Saint Theodosius the Younger had been Emperor for thirty years; he was the son of Arcadius, and Eudoxia, who had exiled Saint John. The Archbishop of Constantinople at that time was Proclus, who had been the Saint's disciple (see Nov. 13 and Nov. 20).


28_ephraim1
January 28

Ephraim the Syrian

Saint Ephraim was born in Nisibis of Mesopotamia some time about the year 306, and in his youth was the disciple of Saint James, Bishop of Nisibis, one of the 318 Fathers at the First Ecumenical Council. Ephraim lived in Nisibis, practicing a severe ascetical life and increasing in holiness, until 363, the year in which Julian the Apostate was slain in his war against the Persians, and his successor Jovian surrendered Nisibis to them. Ephraim then made his dwelling in Edessa, where he found many heresies to do battle with. He waged an especial war against Bardaisan; this gnostic had written many hymns propagating his errors, which by their sweet melodies became popular and enticed souls away from the truth. Saint Ephraim, having received from God a singular gift of eloquence, turned Bardaisan's own weapon against him, and wrote a multitude of hymns to be chanted by choirs of women, which set forth the true doctrines, refuted heretical error, and praised the contests of the Martyrs.

Of the multitude of sermons, commentaries, and hymns that Saint Ephraim wrote, many were translated into Greek in his own lifetime. Sozomen says that Ephraim "Surpassed the most approved writers of Greece," observing that the Greek writings, when translated into other tongues, lose most of their original beauty, but Ephraim's works "are no less admired when read in Greek than when read in Syriac" (Eccl. Hist., Book 111, 16). Saint Ephraim was ordained deacon, some say by Saint Basil the Great, whom Sozomen said "was a great admirer of Ephraim, and was astonished at his erudition." Saint Ephraim was the first to make the poetic expression of hymnody and song a vehicle of Orthodox theological teachings, constituting it an integral part of the Church's worship; he may rightly be called the first and greatest hymnographer of the Church, who set the pattern for these who followed him, especially Saint Romanos the Melodist. Because of this he is called the "Harp of the Holy Spirit." Jerome says that his writings were read in some churches after the reading of the Scriptures, and adds that once he read a Greek translation of one of Ephraim's works, "and recognized, even in translation, the incisive power of his lofty genius" (De vir. ill., ch. CXV).

Shortly before the end of his life, a famine broke out in Edessa, and Saint Ephraim left his cell to rebuke the rich for not sharing their goods with the poor. The rich answered that they knew no one to whom they could entrust their goods. Ephraim asked them, "What do you think of me?" When they confessed their reverence for him, he offered to distribute their alms, to which they agreed. He himself cared with his own hands for many of the sick from the famine, and so crowned his life with mercy and love for neighbor. Saint Ephraim reposed in peace, according to some in the year 373, according to others, 379.


Ignatius_of_antioch_(menologion_of_basil_ii)
January 29

Removal of the Relics of Ignatius the God-bearer

Saint Ignatius was a disciple of Saint John the Theologian, and a successor of the Apostles, and he became the second Bishop of Antioch, after Evodus. He wrote many epistles to the faithful, strengthening them in their confession, and preserving for us the teachings of the holy Apostles. Brought to Rome under Trajan, he was surrendered to lions to be eaten, and so finished the course of martyrdom about the year 107. The remnants of his bones were carefully gathered by the faithful and brought to Antioch. He is called God-bearer, as one who bare God within himself and was aflame in heart with love for Him. Therefore, in his Epistle to the Romans (ch. 4), imploring their love not to attempt to deliver him from his longed-for martyrdom, he said, "I am the wheat of God, and am ground by the teeth of the wild beasts, that I may be found to be the pure bread of God."

Saint John Chrysostom has a homily in honour of the translation of the Saint's relics (PG 50:587).


30_hierarchs1
January 30

Synaxis of The Three Hierarchs: Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, & John Chrysostom

This common feast of these three teachers was instituted a little before the year 1100, during the reign of the Emperor Alexis I Comnenus, because of a dispute and strife that arose among the notable and virtuous men of that time. Some of them preferred Basil, while others preferred Gregory, and yet others preferred John Chrysostom, quarreling among themselves over which of the three was the greatest. Furthermore, each party, in order to distinguish itself from the others, assumed the name of its preferred Saint; hence, they called themselves Basilians, Gregorians, or Johannites. Desiring to bring an end to the contention, the three Saints appeared together to the saintly John Mavropous, a monk who had been ordained Bishop of Euchaita, a city of Asia Minor, they revealed to him that the glory they have at the throne of God is equal, and told him to compose a common service for the three of them, which he did with great skill and beauty. Saint John of Euchaita (celebrated Oct. 5) is also the composer of the Canon to the Guardian Angel, the Protector of a Man's Life. In his old age, he retired from his episcopal see and again took up the monastic life in a monastery in Constantinople. He reposed during the reign of the aforementioned Emperor Alexis Comnenus (1081-1118).


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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal Fourth Mode

You descended from on high, O compassionate One, and condescended to be buried for three days, so that from the passions You might set us free. Our life and resurrection, O Lord, glory be to You.

Apolytikion for the Church/Feast of the Annunciation of the Theotokos in the Fourth Mode

Today is the summary of our salvation, and the revelation of the age-old mystery. For the Son of God becomes the Son of the Virgin, and Gabriel announces the good news of grace. Therefore, let us join him, and cry aloud to the Theotokos: "Rejoice, Maiden full of grace! The Lord is with you."

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode

Your birth sanctified a Virgin's womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon. Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.
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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Matins Gospel Reading

Eleventh Orthros Gospel
The Reading is from John 21:14-25

At that time, Jesus revealed himself to his disciples after he was raised from the dead, and he said to Simon Peter, "Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?" He said to him "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." He said to him, "Feed my lambs." A second time he said to him, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." He said to him, "Tend my sheep." He said to him the third time, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, "Do you love me?" And he said to him, "Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my sheep. Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you girded yourself and walked where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go." (This he said to show by what death he was to glorify God.) And after this he said to him, "Follow me."

Peter turned and saw following them the disciple whom Jesus loved, who had lain close to his breast at the supper and had said, "Lord, who is it that is going to betray you?" When Peter saw him, he said to Jesus, "Lord, what about this man?" Jesus said to him, "If it is my will that he remain until I come, what is that to you? Follow me!" So, the word went out among the brethren that this disciple would not die; but Jesus did not say to him that he would not die, but, "If it is my will that he remain until I come, what is that to you?" This is the disciple who is bearing witness to these things, and who has written these things; and we know that his testimony is true. But there are also many other things which Jesus did; were every one of them to be written, I suppose that the world itself could not contain the books that would be written. Amen.


Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Plagal Fourth Mode. Psalm 75.11,1.
Make your vows to the Lord our God and perform them.
Verse: God is known in Judah; his name is great in Israel.

The reading is from St. Paul's First Letter to Timothy 1:15-17.

Timothy, my son, the saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. And I am the foremost of sinners; but I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience for an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life. To the King of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory to the ages of ages. Amen.


Gospel Reading

14th Sunday of Luke
The Reading is from Luke 18:35-43

At that time, as Jesus drew near to Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging; and hearing a multitude going by, he inquired what this meant. They told him, "Jesus of Nazareth is passing by." And he cried, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" And those who were in front rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out all the more, "Son of David, have mercy on me!" And Jesus stopped, and commanded him to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, "What do you want me to do for you?" He said, "Lord, let me receive my sight." And Jesus said to him, "Receive your sight; your faith has made you well." And immediately he received his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God.


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