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Saint Catherine Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2017-05-21
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Jcblind1
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Saint Catherine Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (561) 833-6387
  • Fax:
  • (561) 833-6391
  • Street Address:

  • 110 Southern Blvd.

  • West Palm Beach, FL 33405


Contact Information




Services Schedule

Sunday Services:

  8:45 am     Orthros

10:00 am     Divine Liturgy

 


Past Bulletins


This Week and Upcoming Events

Remember your Creator in the days of your youth.  (Ecclesiastes 12:1)

Our services are streamed live on the internet.
Access the broadcast from our St. Catherine website
www.stcatherine-wpb.org

 

Download the Orthros (Matins) for Sunday, May 21

Download the Divine Liturgy for Sunday, May 21

 

This Week at Saint Catherine
Sunday, May 21 ~ Sunday of the Blind Man, Saints Constantine and Helen
       8:45 am    Orthros
     10:00 am    Divine Liturgy
     10:00 am    Sunday School
     National AHEPA Sunday
     Sunday School Certificates & Youth Picnic

Monday, May 22
     10:00 am    Becoming Orthodox 3

Thursday, May 25 ~ The Ascension
       9:00 am    Orthros
     10:00 am    Liturgy

Highlights of Upcoming Services and Events
Sunday, May 28 ~ Fathers of the 1st Ecumenical Council
       8:45 am    Orthros
     10:00 am    Divine Liturgy

Monday, May 29 ~ Memorial Day
     Office Closed

Saturday, June 3 ~ Saturday of Souls
       9:00 am    Orthros
     10:00 am    Liturgy       

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Stewardship at Saint Catherine: 

We invite you to join the growing number of Saint Catherine stewards in 2017.  Stewardship is partnership with God and the happiest people on earth are those who have discovered the joy of giving!  Saint Catherine stewards - you are the life blood of our Church.  We thank you for your dedication.

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YouTube

 Many of our Divine Liturgies are available at www.youtube.com.  
Search for “Saint Catherine Greek Orthodox Church”.  Subscribe to our YouTube channel.

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Family Life Blog

Our Metropolis of Atlanta Family Life Blog has wonderful inspiring material for families and each of us as individuals.  Take a look at the flyer on our Saint Catherine home page.  Read and share the Family Life blog which is at:     http://www.familylifeministry.atlanta.goarch.org/

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Orthodox Christian Programs

Did you know that we have Orthodox Christian programs available 24 hours a day, seven days of  the week?  There is the weekly Come Receive the Light program and three channels of content to listen to in addition to special presentations in the form of podcasts, articles and videos.  Take a break from your routine to read / listen / watch the Orthodox content from the Orthodox Christian Network (OCN).  All are all available at:     http://myocn.net/

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Event Flyers

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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Matins Gospel Reading

Eighth Orthros Gospel
The Reading is from John 20:11-18

At that time, Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. They said to her, "Woman, why are you weeping?" She said to them, "Because they have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid Him." Saying this, she turned round and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, "Woman, why are you weeping? Whom do you seek?" Supposing Him to be the gardener, she said to Him, "Sir, if you have carried Him away, tell me where you have laid Him, and I will take Him away." Jesus said to her, "Mary." She turned and said to him in Hebrew, "Rabboni!" (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, "Do not hold me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brethren and say to them, I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God." Mary Magdalene went and said to the disciples, "I have seen the Lord"; and she told them that He had said these things to her.


Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Fourth Tone. Psalm 18.4,1.
Their voice has gone out into all the earth.
Verse: The heavens declare the glory of God.

The reading is from Acts of the Apostles 26:1, 12-20.

IN THOSE DAYS, King Agrippa said to Paul, "You have permission to speak for yourself." Then Paul stretched out his hand and made his defense: "I journeyed to Damascus with the authority and commission of the chief priests. At midday, O king, I saw on the way a light from heaven, brighter than the sun, shining round me and those who journeyed with me. And when we had all fallen to the ground, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? It hurts you to kick against the goads.' And I said, 'Who are you, Lord?' And the Lord said, 'I am Jesus whom you are persecuting. But rise and stand upon your feet; for I have appeared to you for this purpose, to appoint you to serve and bear witness to the things in which you have seen me and to those in which I will appear to you, delivering you from the people and from the Gentiles-to whom I send you to open their eyes, that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and a place among those who are sanctified by faith in me.' "Wherefore, O King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision, but declared first to those at Damascus, then at Jerusalem and throughout all the country of Judea, and also to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God and perform deeds worthy of their repentance."


Gospel Reading

Sunday of the Blind Man
The Reading is from John 9:1-38

At that time, as Jesus passed by, he saw a man blind from his birth. And his disciples asked him, "Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?" Jesus answered, "It was not that this man sinned, or his parents, but that the works of God might be made manifest in him. We must work the works of him who sent me, while it is day; night comes, when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world." As he said this, he spat on the ground and made clay of the spittle and anointed the man's eyes with the clay, saying to him, "Go, wash in the pool of Siloam" (which means Sent). So he went and washed and came back seeing. The neighbors and those who had seen him before as a beggar, said, "Is not this the man who used to sit and beg?" Some said, "It is he"; others said, "No, but he is like him." He said, "I am the man." They said to him, "Then how were your eyes opened?" He answered, "The man called Jesus made clay and anointed my eyes and said to me, 'Go to Siloam and wash'; so I went and washed and received my sight." They said to him, "Where is he?" He said, "I do not know."

They brought to the Pharisees the man who had formerly been blind. Now it was a sabbath day when Jesus made the clay and opened his eyes. The Pharisees again asked him how he had received his sight. And he said to them, "He put clay on my eyes and I washed, and I see." Some of the Pharisees said, "This man is not from God, for he does not keep the sabbath." But others said, "How can a man who is a sinner do such signs?" There was a division among them. So they again said to the blind man, "What do you say about him, since he has opened your eyes?" He said, "He is a prophet."

The Jews did not believe that he had been blind and had received his sight, until they called the parents of the man who had received his sight, and asked them, "Is this your son, who you say was born blind? How then does he now see?" His parents answered, "We know that this is our son, and that he was born blind; but how he now sees we do not know, nor do we know who opened his eyes. Ask him; he is of age, he will speak for himself." His parents said this because they feared the Jews, for the Jews had already agreed that if anyone should confess him to be Christ he was to be put out of the synagogue. Therefore his parents said, "He is of age, ask him."

So for the second time they called the man who had been blind, and said to him, "Give God the praise; we know that this man is a sinner." He answered, "Whether he is a sinner, I do not know; one thing I know, that though I was blind, now I see." They said to him, "What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?" He answered them, "I have told you already and you would not listen. Why do you want to hear it again? Do you too want to become his disciples?" And they reviled him, saying, "You are his disciple, but we are disciples of Moses. We know that God has spoken to Moses, but as for this man, we do not know where he comes from." The man answered, "Why, this is a marvel! You do not know where he comes from, and yet he opened my eyes. We know that God does not listen to sinners, but if anyone is a worshiper of God and does his will, God listens to him. Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a man born blind. If this man were not from God, he could do nothing." They answered him, "You were born in utter sin, and would you teach us?" And they cast him out.

Jesus heard that they had cast him out, and having found him he said, "Do you believe in the Son of man?" He answered, "And who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?" Jesus said to him, "You have seen him, and it is he who speaks to you." He said, "Lord, I believe": and he worshiped him.


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Wisdom of the Fathers

But I assert that he even received benefit from his blindness: since he recovered the sight of the eyes within.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 56 on John 9, 4th Century

When, then, have they taken place, save when the Word of God Himself came in the body? Or when did He come, if not when lame men walked, and stammerers were made to speak plain, and deaf men heard, and men blind from birth regained their sight? For this was the very thing the Jews said who then witnessed it, because they had not heard of these things having taken place at any other time.
St. Athanasius
Incarnation of the Word 38, 4th Century

The work of God is, after all, the forming of man. He did this by an outward action, as Scripture says, 'And the Lord took clay from earth, and formed man.' Notice here too how the Lord spit on the earth, and made clay and smeared it on his eyes, showing how the ancient creation was made. He was making clear to those who can understand, that this was the [same] hand of God through which man was formed from clay.
St. Irenaeus
Against Heresies. 5.15.2. Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture. Vol: John 1-10. Intervarsity Press, 2006, p. 324.

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Hymns of the Day

Apolytikion of Great and Holy Pascha in the Plagal First Tone

Christ is risen from the dead, by death, trampling down upon death, and to those in the tombs He has granted life.

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal First Tone

Eternal with the Father and the Spirit is the Word, Who of a Virgin was begotten for our salvation. As the faithful we both praise and worship Him, for in the flesh did He consent to ascend unto the Cross, and death did He endure and He raised unto life the dead through His all glorious resurrection.

Apolytikion for Constantine and Helen in the Plagal Fourth Tone

He beheld the image of Your Cross in the Heavens and, as Paul, he too did not receive the call from men. Your Apostle among Kings placed the care of the Royal City in Your hands. Through the intercessions of the Theotokos, O only Loving Lord, keep it ever in peace.

The Apolytikion of Saint Catherine in the Plagal First Tone

Let us praise in hymns the all-lauded bride of Christ,* Catherine, the guardian of Sinai,* who is our help and our support;* for by the power of the Spirit she silenced brilliantly* the nobility of liars.*  And now that she has been crowned as a Martyr,* she seeks for all Great Mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Plagal Fourth Tone

Though You went down into the tomb, You destroyed Hades' power, and You rose the victor, Christ God, saying to the myrrh-bearing women, "Hail!" and granting peace to Your disciples, You who raise up the fallen.
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Saints and Feasts

Jcblind1
May 21

Sunday of the Blind Man

The Lord Jesus was coming from the Temple on the Sabbath, when, while walking in the way, He saw the blind man mentioned in today's Gospel. This man had been born thus from his mother's womb, that is, he had been born without eyes (see Saint John Chrysostom, Homily LVI on Matthew; Saint Irenaeus, Against Heresies, Book V:15; and the second Exorcism of Saint Basil the Great). When the disciples saw this, they asked their Teacher, "Who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind?" They asked this because when the Lord had healed the paralytic at the Sheep's Pool, He had told him, "Sin no more, lest a worse thing come unto thee" (John 5:14); so they wondered, if sickness was caused by sin, what sin could have been the cause of his being born without eyes. But the Lord answered that this was for the glory of God. Then the God-man spat on the ground and made clay with the spittle. He anointed the eyes of the blind man and said to him, "Go, wash in the Pool of Siloam." Siloam (which means "sent") was a well-known spring in Jerusalem used by the inhabitants for its waters, which flowed to the eastern side of the city and collected in a large pool called "the Pool of Siloam."

Therefore, the Saviour sent the blind man to this pool that he might wash his eyes, which had been anointed with the clay-not that the pool's water had such power, but that the faith and obedience of the one sent might be made manifest, and that the miracle might become more remarkable and known to all, and leave no room for doubt. Thus, the blind man believed in Jesus' words, obeyed His command, went and washed himself, and returned, no longer blind, but having eyes and seeing. This was the greatest miracle that our Lord had yet worked; as the man healed of his blindness himself testified, "Since time began, never was it heard that any man opened the eyes of one that was born blind," although the Lord had already healed the blind eyes of many. Because he now had eyes, some even doubted that he was the same person (John 9:8-9); and it was still lively in their remembrance when Christ came to the tomb of Lazarus, for they said, "Could not this man, who opened the eyes of the blind man, have caused that even this man should not have died?" Saint John Chrysostom gives a thorough and brilliant exposition of our Lord's meeting with the woman of Samaria, the healing of the paralytic, and the miracle of the blind man in his commentaries on the Gospel of Saint John.


21_conshel
May 21

Constantine and Helen, Equal-to-the Apostles

This great and renowned sovereign of the Christians was the son of Constantius Chlorus (the ruler of the westernmost parts of the Roman empire), and of the blessed Helen. He was born in 272, in (according to some authorities) Naissus of Dardania, a city on the Hellespont. In 306, when his father died, he was proclaimed successor to his throne. In 312, on learning that Maxentius and Maximinus had joined forces against him, he marched into Italy, where, while at the head of his troops, he saw in the sky after midday, beneath the sun, a radiant pillar in the form of a cross with the words: "By this shalt thou conquer." The following night, our Lord Jesus Christ appeared to him in a dream and declared to him the power of the Cross and its significance. When he arose in the morning, he immediately ordered that a labarum be made (which is a banner or standard of victory over the enemy) in the form of a cross, and he inscribed on it the Name of Jesus Christ. On the 28th Of October, he attacked and mightily conquered Maxentius, who drowned in the Tiber River while fleeing. The following day, Constantine entered Rome in triumph and was proclaimed Emperor of the West by the Senate, while Licinius, his brother-in-law, ruled in the East. But out of malice, Licinius later persecuted the Christians. Constantine fought him once and again, and utterly destroyed him in 324, and in this manner he became monarch over the West and the East. Under him and because of him all the persecutions against the Church ceased. Christianity triumphed and idolatry was overthrown. In 325 he gathered the First Ecumenical Council in Nicaea, which he himself personally addressed. In 324, in the ancient city of Byzantium, he laid the foundations of the new capital of his realm, and solemnly inaugurated it on May 11, 330, naming it after himself, Constantinople. Since the throne of the imperial rule was transferred thither from Rome, it was named New Rome, the inhabitants of its domain were called Romans, and it was considered the continuation of the Roman Empire. Falling ill near Nicomedia, he requested to receive divine Baptism, according to Eusebius (The Life of Constantine. Book IV, 61-62), and also according to Socrates and Sozomen; and when he had been deemed worthy of the Holy Mysteries, he reposed in 337, on May 21 or 22, the day of Pentecost, having lived sixty-five years, of which he ruled for thirty-one years. His remains were transferred to Constantinople and were deposed in the Church of the Holy Apostles, which had been built by him (see Homily XXVI on Second Corinthians by Saint John Chrysostom).

As for his holy mother Helen, after her son had made the Faith of Christ triumphant throughout the Roman Empire, she undertook a journey to Jerusalem and found the Holy Cross on which our Lord was crucified (see Sept. 13 and 14). After this, Saint Helen, in her zeal to glorify Christ, erected churches in Jerusalem at the sites of the Crucifixion and Resurrection, in Bethlehem at the cave where our Saviour was born, another on the Mount of Olives whence He ascended into Heaven, and many others throughout the Holy Land, Cyprus, and elsewhere. She was proclaimed Augusta, her image was stamped upon golden coins, and two cities were named Helenopolis after her in Bithynia and in Palestine. Having been thus glorified for her piety, she departed to the Lord being about eighty years of age, according to some in the year 330, according to others, in 336.


Allsaint
May 22

Basiliscus the Martyr, Bishop of Comana

This Martyr was from the city of Amasia on the Black Sea, and a nephew of Saint Theodore the Tyro (Feb. 17). When his fellow Martyrs Eutropius and Cleonicus had been crucified (see Mar.8), Basiliscus was shut up in prison. As he was praying the Lord to count him also worthy to finish his course as a martyr, the Lord appeared to him, telling him first to go to his kinsmen and bid them farewell, which he did. When it was learned that he had left the prison, soldiers came after him, and brought him to Comana of Cappadocia, compelling him to walk in iron shoes set with nails. He was beheaded at Comana, and his body was cast into the river, during the reign of Diocletian (284-305).


Resurect
May 24

Apodosis of Pascha


Allsaint
May 24

Symeon the Stylite of the Mountain

Saint Symeon, the "New Stylite," was born in Antioch; John his father was from Edessa, and Martha his mother was from Antioch. From his childhood he was under the special guidance of Saint John the Baptist and adopted an extremely ascetical way of life. He became a monk as a young man, and after living in the monastery for a while he ascended upon a pillar, and abode upon it for eighteen years. Then he came to Wondrous Mountain, and lived in a dry and rocky place, where after ten years he mounted another pillar, upon which he lived in great hardship for forty-five years, working many miracles and being counted worthy of divine revelations. He reposed in 595, at the age of eighty-five years, seventy-nine of which he had passed in asceticism.


Allsaint
May 23

Michael the Confessor, Bishop of Synnada

This Saint was from Synnada in Phrygia of Asia Minor. In Constantinople he met Saint Theophylact (see Mar. 8); the holy Patriarch Tarasius, learning that Michael and Theophylact desired to become monks, sent them to a monastery on the Black Sea. Because of their great virtue, Saint Tarasius afterwards compelled them to accept consecration, Theophylact as Bishop of Nicomedia, and Michael as Bishop of his native Synnada. Because Saint Michael fearlessly confessed the veneration of the holy icons, he was banished by the Iconoclast Emperor Leo V the Armenian, who reigned from 813 to 820. After being driven from one place to another, in many hardships and bitter pains, Saint Michael died in exile.


Allsaint
May 24

Saint Vincent of Lerins

Saint Vincent was born in Toul in Gaul; he was the brother of Saint Lupus, Bishop of Troyes, who was a companion of Saint Germanus of Auxerre. Saint Vincent was first a soldier, then left the world to become a monk of the renowned monastery of Lerins, where he was also ordained priest. He is known for his Commonitorium, which he wrote as an aid to distinguish the true teachings of the Church from the confusions of heretics; his most memorable saying is that Christians must follow that Faith which has been believed "everywhere, always, and by all." He wrote the Commonitorium about the year 434, three years after the Third Ecumenical Council in Ephesus, which he mentions in the Commonitorium, and defends calling the holy Virgin Theotokos, "She who gave birth to God," in opposition to the teachings of Nestorius which were condemned at the Third Council.

Without identifying by name Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, Saint Vincent condemns his doctrine of Grace and predestination, calling it heresy to teach of "a certain great and special and altogether personal grace of God [which is given to the predestined elect] without any labour, without any effort, without any industry, even though they neither ask, nor seek, nor knock" (Commonitorium, ch. XXVI). See also Saint John Cassian, February 29; Saint John Cassian wrote his refutations before, and Saint Vincent after, the condemnation of Nestorius at the Third Council in 431, and the death of Augustine in 430. Saint Vincent reposed in peace about the year 445.


Ascension
May 25

Holy Ascension

The Lord Jesus passed forty days on earth after His Resurrection from the dead, appearing continually in various places to His disciples, with whom He also spoke, ate, and drank, thereby further demonstrating His Resurrection. On this Thursday, the fortieth day after Pascha, He appeared again in Jerusalem. After He had first spoken to the disciples about many things, He gave them His last commandment, that is, that they go forth and proclaim His Name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. But He also commanded them that for the present, they were not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait there together until they receive power from on high, when the Holy Spirit would come upon them.

Saying these things, He led them to the Mount of Olives, and raising His hands, He blessed them; and saying again the words of the Father's blessing, He was parted from them and taken up. Immediately a cloud of light, a proof of His majesty, received Him. Sitting thereon as though on a royal chariot, He was taken up into Heaven, and after a short time was concealed from the sight of the disciples, who remained where they were with their eyes fixed on Him. At this point, two Angels in the form of men in white raiment appeared to them and said, "Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into Heaven? This same Jesus, Who is taken up from you into Heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen Him go into Heaven" (Acts 1:11). These words, in a complete and concise manner, declare what is taught in the Symbol of Faith concerning the Son and Word of God. Therefore, having so fulfilled all His dispensation for us, our Lord Jesus Christ ascended in glory into Heaven, and sat at the right hand of God the Father. As for His sacred disciples, they returned from the Mount of Olives to Jerusalem, rejoicing because Christ had promised to send them the Holy Spirit.

It should be noted that the Mount of Olives is a Sabbath's day journey from Jerusalem, that is, the distance a Jew was permitted to walk on the day of the Sabbath. Ecumenius writes, "A Sabbath day's journey is one mile in length, as Clement says in his fifth Stromatis; it is two thousand cubits, as the Interpretation of the Acts states." They draw this conclusion from the fact that, while they were in the wilderness, the Israelites of old kept within this distance from the Holy Tabernacle, whither they walked on the Sabbath day to worship God.


07_john2
May 25

Third Finding of the Precious Head of St. John the Baptist

Because of the vicissitudes of time, the venerable head of the holy Forerunner was lost for a third time and rediscovered in Comana of Cappadocia through a revelation to 'a certain priest, but it was found not, as before, in a clay jar, but in a silver vessel, and "in a sacred place." It was taken from Comana to Constantinople and was met with great solemnity by the Emperor, the Patriarch, and the clergy and people. See also February 24.


Allsaint
May 26

Carpos and Alphaeus, Apostles of the 70

This holy Apostle was numbered with the Seventy, and ministered unto the holy Apostle Paul, journeying with him and conveying his epistles unto those to whom they were written. He became Bishop of Beroea in Thrace, where he endured great tribulations while bringing many of the heathen to holy Baptism, and also suffered martyrdom there. Saint Paul mentions him in II Timothy 4:13.


Allsaint
May 27

The Holy Hieromartyr Helladius

Concerning Saint Helladius, little is known except that he was a bishop who refused to sacrifice to idols, and that during his martyrdom our Lord Jesus Christ appeared to him and healed him of his wounds, after which he was cast into fire and was preserved unharmed, suffered further torments, and finally was beaten to death with the blows of fists.


Johnrussian
May 27

John the Russian of Evia

The Holy New Confessor John, a native of Russia, was captured during the Russian campaign against the Turks in 1711 and was thereafter sold into slavery in Asia Minor. In this condition he struggled to serve God in piety even while he served his earthly master in all that was needful. He remained steadfast in the Christian Faith in the face of the many enticements the Moslems provided to lure him to their error, and was granted the grace to work miracles by his prayers. He reposed in peace in 1730. His relics remained incorrupt and are found at New Procopion of Euboia in Greece.


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Metropolis of Atlanta

Message from Metropolitan Alexios

My Beloved Ones,

Χριστὸς ἀνέστη! Christ is Risen!

This coming Wednesday, the Orthodox Church will conclude the 40 day Paschal period. We shall cease singing Christos Anesti and we shall replace the Epitaphios—which has remained on the Holy Altar as a sign of the burial cloth in the empty tomb—until next year.

However, this “leave-taking” of Pascha is not a somber affair, for just as Christ’s sacrifice and Resurrection were necessary to redeem humanity’s fallen nature, so too was it necessary for him to ascend to His father. As He told His disciples, “In my Father's house are many mansions... I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also” (John 14:1).

Therefore, though Christ departs from this earth on this coming Thursday’s feast of the Ascension, He leaves His disciples with a sense of anticipation, and a mission.

First, Christ entrusts the growth of His Church to the disciples, but He does not abandon them. Indeed, He not only promises to always be with them and us, but instructs them to remain in Jerusalem until the day when the Paraclete, the Helper, arrives. In this way, the Feast of Ascension points us toward the Feast of Pentecost, ten days later.

However, just as all the events of the liturgical calendar take place in the present, perhaps the most important aspect of the Ascension is the Great Commission. Christ’s final earthly instruction to His disciples is not some historical event, but a present reality. As followers of Christ and His Church, we too are asked to be “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you…” (Matthew 28:19-20)

In this modern era, where so much of the world has already encountered or been touched by Christianity, it would be easy to dismiss our Lord’s exhortation as a command that has been fulfilled. However, our understanding of Christ and His Church is not a static one, but dynamic. We are not asked to live out our faith as a private matter, but to demonstrate the will and love of Christ in every word and action we undertake. In this way, we can witness our faith in the Risen and Ascended Christ to all our neighbors, whether Christian or otherwise.

In the Ascension account contained in the Acts of the Apostles, after Jesus has been taken up, the amazed disciples are greeted by two men in white robes who ask, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into heaven? This Jesus, who was taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven” (Acts 1:11). The Evangelist does his utmost to remind us that Christ will return in all His power and glory, solidifying our need to be vigilant and fulfill the Evangelistic Commission.

I shall take the opportunity to wish you once more a resounding Χριστὸς ἀνέστη! as well as a blessed Feast of the Ascension.

+ALEXIOS
Metropolitan of Atlanta

 

 

The Panagia Chapel Roof Tiles Campaign:     Our opportunity to place the names of our loved ones in the Holy Altar of the Panagia Chapel.

April 24, 2017


My Beloved Brothers and Sisters in our Resurrected Lord


CRISTOS ANESTH!

Christ is Risen! Truly He is Risen!

I greet you all with a joyful heart as we live in the renewal of our Lord’s Resurrection. I
come before you today, to encourage all of us to work together hand in hand for the
completion of the Panagia Chapel, which is the jewel of our Metropolis at the Diakonia
Retreat Center in Salem, SC, through the Roof Tiles Campaign.

As someone who fervently prays for the spiritual lives of all our faithful, I believe that
the Panagia Chapel allows all of us—including our young people—to feel inspired, as we
work towards that common goal when we are able to gather together and worship as the
Body of Christ.

I am asking each faithful household of our Holy Metropolis to participate by submitting
names of both living and departed loved ones (even if you are not financially able to
contribute to the Roof Tiles Campaign). I do not want anyone to miss the blessing to
submit names, for it is a great one; because not only will the list of names be sealed
within the Holy Altar and with Holy Relics during the consecration of our Chapel, but
the names will be commemorated at all the services throughout the year and the years to come.

I thank you for your continued support. I pray that during this season of renewal, we
will all be uplifted by our communal vision, as we seek to create an environment which
will ensure that our children, grandchildren, and countless future generations always
have a place which reflects God’s glory and the living presence of the Saints. On behalf of the faithful souls in our Metropolis, I remain,

With paternal blessings and with much love in our Risen Lord,


+ALEXIOS
Metropolitan of Atlanta

 

The Strategic Plan

Strategic_plan_logo_final
Strategic Plan Updates

After many months of hard work and much anticipation, the first goals of the Metropolis of Atlanta Strategic Plan are complete and there is content on the Web Portal for download. Parishioners are invited to use the new content found at www.atlstrategicplan.org/portal to enhance their efforts working for the Church and its many ministries. The completed Goals include: 1.1 Parish Strategic Planning, 3.3 Communications Director, 5.4 Seniors Program, 10.1 Metropolis Website and 10.3 Best Practices Metropolis Resource Center Portal. In addition to the first content, the website has been redesigned for ease of use. For more information please visit www.atlstrategicplan.org. If you have questions, contact your Parish Champion or communications@atlmetropolis.org.

 

Family Life Ministry

The Metropolis of Atlanta’s Family Life Ministry (www.familylifeministry.atlanta.goarch.org) strengthens individuals, families and church families through adaptable programs, blogs and educational materials as a means of fostering connection within our homes and our parishes. 

In this third episode of the “Family Insights” Podcast , Paula Marchman (Managing Director of FLM) and Eleni Alexiou (Managing Director of OCN) continue the discussion of how we all make mistakes and how struggles can be good. Together these counselors will walk you through the important topics so that you can gain insight into your family. Sit back today, listen, and find your deep breathe.

To listen, visit the podcast’s page HERE.

 

Journey of Marriage (Pre-Marital Seminar)

All couples marrying in the Metropolis must attend a Metropolis-sponsored Journey of Marriage seminar prior to their wedding. The couple will present their certificate of completion to their parish priest after the seminar.

Saint Catherine hosted a Jouney of Marriage Seminar on Saturday, May 6th.

To see the full list of seminars through 2017, and to register, please visit: http://www.familylifeministry.atlanta.goarch.org/upcoming-events-2/

 

When you shop with Amazon, you can donate to the Diakonia Retreat Center

Shop with Amazon, donate to the DRC

Amazon Smile is a program that allows for 0.5% of your eligible Amazon purchase to be donated to the Diakonia Retreat Center. To find our Amazon Smile page, visit https://smile.amazon.com/ch/91-2187047.

 

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Panagia Chapel

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The Panagia Chapel is now being built at our Diakonia Retreat Center.  Upon completion it will be the heart and life for all who attend retreats there, a unique place of prayer for all in our Metropolis now and for generations to come.

Click here to see photos of the construction as of February 15, 2017, during the Clergy Syndesmos Late Winter Retreat.

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Assembly of Bishops News

Go and Make Disciples: Evangelization and Outreach in US Orthodox Parishes

04/24/2017

The first ever, national study on evangelization and outreach in Orthodox parishes in the United States has been released by the Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the USA. The report 'Go and Make Disciples: Evangelization and Outreach in US Orthodox Parishes' explores the practices and strategies developed by some Orthodox parishes that can be viewed as 'exemplary' in their missionary and outreach efforts.

Assembly Chairman's Message for Holy Pascha 2017

04/12/2017

Pascha 2017 - To the Reverend Priests and Deacons, the Monks and Nuns, the Presidents and Members of Parish Councils, the Day, Afternoon, and Church Schools, the Members of Philanthropic Organizations, the Youth and Youth Workers, and the entire Orthodox Christian Family in the United States of America

Greek Orthodox Archdiocese to Continue Successful Fellowships at the UN

02/07/2017

The Department of Inter-Orthodox, Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America is inviting graduate and recent post-graduate students to apply for its fellowships at the United Nations.

New Map of Bishops and Parishes Available on the Assembly Website

12/07/2016

An updated map of Orthodox bishops and parishes in the US is now available on the Assembly's website.

Message of the Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the United States of America

10/06/2016

We, the members of the Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the United States of America, gathered in Detroit, Michigan, for our seventh annual meeting on October 4-6, 2016 greet you with love in Christ as we offer glory and thanksgiving to Him. Forty-one hierarchs assembled in order to recognize and reinforce our unity in the Orthodox faith.

Address of the Chairman His Eminence Archbishop Demetrios of America at the 7th Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the United States of America

10/06/2016

Having approached and partaken in the Holy Eucharist as members of the Body of Christ, we convene here in Detroit, Michigan. It is a city whose people have experienced the results of decades of neglect, isolation, and abandonment, but now steadily move forward on the path of transformation towards a renewed life. I cannot help but reflect upon the idea of transformation in our case. We truly need a transformation in Christ, with Christ, and for Christ leading to unity, holiness and effective service. And if this is so, we must, following the Apostle Paul, strive to know Christ and the power of His resurrection and the sharing of His sufferings (Phil. 3:10), and following the Apostle Peter, with a sincere love for the brethren and from a pure heart let us love one another intensely (1 Peter 1:22).

Official Website of Holy and Great Council Now Online

05/25/2016

The official website of the Holy and Great Council is now online.

Atlas of American Orthodox Monasteries Now Available

02/11/2016

The Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the United States of America announces the publication of the first-ever Atlas of American Orthodox Christian Monasteries.
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Message from His Eminence Archbishop Demetrios

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Encyclical for AHEPA Sunday (5/21/2017)

05/17/2017

For almost a century this has been the focus of the members of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association. Today we honor this legacy of compassion and service by observing AHEPA Sunday and offering our gratitude to the members of the AHEPA family. Throughout our Holy Archdiocese, these faithful servants of God are leaders in their parishes, in the institutions and organizations of the Church, and in using the strength and mission of AHEPA to meet vital needs around the world.
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Greek Orthodox Archdiocese News

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Metropolitan Philotheos of Meloa Laid to Rest

05/16/2017

The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America and the Omogeneia accompanied Metropolitan Philotheos of Meloa to his last resting place yesterday, May 15, 2017.

All Saints Greek Orthodox Church Concludes Centennial Celebration with Divine Liturgy

05/15/2017

This Mother’s Day weekend (May 13-14, 2017), the historic parish of All Saints, “a beacon of Orthodoxy in the Ohio valley,” celebrated its 100-year anniversary and His Eminence Archbishop Demetrios Geron of America together with the local hierarch, Metropolitan Savas of Pittsburgh led this feast of faith, joy and love.
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